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Parents concerned about cyberbullying

Although cyberbullying doesn't have the same, obvious physical signs that physical bullying does, it can be just as painful.

Although cyberbullying doesn't have the same, obvious physical signs that physical bullying does, it can be just as painful.

That's why parents say monitoring your kids accounts is very important.

Nicolle Burris, a mother of five, said she allows her kids to use social media, but keeps an eye on what they're doing on there.

"I really try to nip the internet, social media stuff in the bud immediately,” Burris said. “I really don't have a problem with it and I enjoy the kids being able to get on there and explore and get out there and see different things, but it does come at a cost. The cost is bullying, arguments and fighting sometimes."

Social media is daunting even to parents with young kids.

Kristin White said she doesn't know if she'll allow her five-year-old son Connor to have a social media account when he gets older.

"Being at an adolescent age, he's not able to understand the dangers of it and how it can affect his self-esteem and confidence," White said.

Because of the pain social media can cause, schools across the country now have social media policies.

Williamsville Junior High School has implemented curriculum that educates their 5th through 8th graders on responsibly using social media.

"The hope is that we want to empower victims of bullying so that way they can help themselves in the future and not just feel alone in the situation," said Clay Shoufler, the principal at Williamsville Junior High School.

If someone does fall victim to cyberbullying, Williamsville has an incident reporting system. Students, parents and staff can report bullying to faculty members. A plan to resolve the problem will then be worked out.

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